Restraint and Seclusion

On May 30, 2021, the Illinois legislature passed HB219which will further restrict the use of time out and physical restraint in Illinois schools. The legislation will take effect upon signature by Governor Pritzker. You may recall that similar bills have been introduced over the last several sessions, and the current bill is very similar to the version we previously highlighted for you. The legislature took action at the close of this session and just days following the publication of another Pro Publica article showing continued reliance on time out and physical restraint, despite reduced in-person instruction this year. The main components of the bill include (1) additional oversight from ISBE; (2) district level plans to reduce the use of isolated time out, time out, and physical restraint; (3) codification of definitions and rules in the current regulations (with a few modifications); and (4) the opportunity for parents to request a post-incident meeting to debrief.  

Continue Reading Illinois Legislature Passes Bill Further Restricting Time Out and Physical Restraint

Over the past year, the use of physical restraint and seclusion in schools has come under increased scrutiny. While ISBE issued emergency rules at the end of last November, followed by a series of updates and then final rules in April 2020, state and federal legislators have also been working on proposed laws that would both limit the use of physical restraint and seclusion and require plans to decrease the use of these techniques over time.

The Illinois legislation, Senate Bill 2315, was introduced last November. After input from stakeholders and various revisions, the bill appeared ready to move during veto session. As veto session was canceled, we may see a vote on the bill during the lame duck session in January. On the federal side, the Keeping All Students Safe Act was first introduced in 2009 (at that time called the Preventing Harmful Restraint and Seclusion in Schools Act). The bill has been reintroduced in the years since but never had sufficient support to pass. The bill was recently reintroduced in the House, and President-Elect Biden has voiced his support of the legislation.

Given the increasing possibility that one or both of these bills could become law, now is good time to learn more about their details. Here are the highlights:

Illinois

Federal

  • Prohibit prone restraint
  • Require schools to offer a meeting to parents after each incident of restraint or time out
  • Require districts to create oversight teams to develop school-specific plans to reduce and eventually eliminate the use of physical restraint and time out, as well as annual reporting on progress
  • Subject to appropriation, provide grants for schools to implement positive behavioral interventions and supports aimed at reducing the need for physical restraint and time out
 
  • Prohibit prone and supine restraint and seclusion
  • Limit on the use of physical restraint and prohibit including it as a planned intervention in a student’s IEP or BIP
  • Require a meeting with parents and staff after an incident of restraint
  • Provide for a State-approved crisis intervention training program, as well as state mechanisms to effectively monitor and enforce compliance
  • Provide for a private right of action
  • Provide for grants to states to assist with complying with the new legislation, collecting and analyzing data, and improving school climate and culture


Continue Reading Proposed State and Federal Legislation Would Further Reduce Physical Restraint and Time Out in Schools

Last fall, in response to serious concerns raised about the use of isolated time out and physical restraint in schools, ISBE issued emergency rules to limit the use of those behavior management techniques. Emergency rules are effective for up to 150 days or until permanent rules are approved, and these emergency rules were due to expire on April 17, 2020.  On April 9, ISBE and JCAR (the bipartisan legislative oversight committee responsible for reviewing and approving agency rulemaking) passed permanent rules regarding isolated time out, time out, and physical restraint. The new rules allow the use of isolated time out as well as prone and supine restraint in limited circumstances, but the provisions related to prone and supine restraint terminate on July 1, 2021.   

Continue Reading ISBE Adopts Permanent Rules on Isolated Time Out, Time Out, and Physical Restraint

Sign From Presentation at IAASEDana Fattore Crumley and Kendra Yoch were honored to present at the IAASE 21st Annual Winter Conference in Springfield on “The Crossroads of Special Education Evaluation and Risk Assessment: Which Issue Has the Right of Way?” For anyone who was not able to make the conference or session, here is a handy recap and some key takeaways to bring you up to speed on the intersection between threat assessment and special education evaluations.

Continue Reading What Did I Miss? Recap of IAASE Presentation on Special Education Evaluations and Threat Assessments

Last week, ISBE reversed course on isolated time out. After initially banning the practice in late November 2019, ISBE heard from many stakeholders that having a staff member in a time out room with an escalated student was often unsafe. The recent amendment to the emergency rules seeks to limit and regulate the use of isolated time out rather than prohibit it altogether. Accordingly, ISBE updated its Guidance and Frequently Asked Questions and reporting form to reflect the new development.
Continue Reading Isolated Time Out is Back (for now): ISBE Issues Revised Guidance and Reporting Form After Second Amendment to Emergency Rules on Time Out and Physical Restraint